[11] Around this same time, Hormel began to expand by acquiring additional meatpacking plants in several other American cities,[11][12] and in both 1976 and 1981–82 they urged workers at the Austin plant to either transfer to these new plants or take a severance package. [61] While negotiations continued in Austin, in Ottumwa a mediator ruled that the 507 workers who had been fired at the Hormel plant there in response to the roving picket should be reinstated with full seniority. Women, Community, and the Hormel Strike of 1985-1986. [14], In 1975, citing a need to stay competitive, Hormel declared their intent to construct a new meatpacking facility to replace their flagship plant in Austin, calling the then 80-year-old building outdated. [13] As a non-union meatpacking company, the IBP's labor costs were almost half those at a union company such as Hormel. Yet, this strike by less than two thousand workers remains controversial. [43] April 9 began three days of protests that again involved blocking access to the plant. Leadership at the National United Food and Commercial Workers union order the local P-9 Hormel union to end the strike. In December of 1984, the members of United Food and Commercial Workers Union local P-9 initiated a campaign against wage and benefit cuts at the Hormel Company in Austin, Minnesota. Encyclopedia.com. The Watsonville cannery strike is one of these struggles, the Hormel strike is another. Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography. Following the riot, Jesse Jackson traveled to Austin to act as mediator, with no success. "[56] After the UFCW had occupied Local P-9's offices, they attempted to remove the mural, but found no unionized sandblasters willing to remove the art, leading to UFCW staffers removing it. Major employers in the United States include Kraft Heinz, Hormel, Pilgrim's Pride Corporation, Smithfield Foods, and Tyson Foods. On 19 August 1985 Local P-9 of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) went on strike against Geo. In late 1984, members of Local P-9 of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) union began a coordinated campaign against major wage and benefit cuts by Hormel, a meatpacking company in Austin, Minnesota. [22], Through February and into March, large rallies were also held in several large American cities, including Detroit, New York City, and San Francisco. Hormel Foods was ranked No. "[45] While Jackson did continue to speak with executives at Hormel for the next few weeks, urging them to continue talks with Local P-9, nothing came of these talks, and Jackson would not return to Austin for the duration of the strike. [note 2], With a substantial part of their workforce gone, Hormel temporarily shut down operations at their Austin plant. 15% OFF. P-9's leaders maintained that the need to resist concessions and regain the $10.69 level outweighed the need to cooperate with other local unions. On November 13, 1933, in what historians have suggested was the first officially-recorded sitdown strike in U.S. history, victorious workers at the Hormel…continue reading → U.S.A. Leadership at the National United Food and Commercial Workers union order the local P-9 Hormel union to end the strike. Families stopped talking. ###*With a Foreword by Peter Rachleff*### In December of 1984, the members of United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local P-9 initiated a campaign against wage and benefit concessions at Geo. On August 7, 1985,[2] 93% of Local P-9 voted to authorize a strike. ." This play tells the story", "Review: 'Spamtown, USA' compellingly conveys a community in conflict", "Austin Journal; The Home of Hormel: A Town Still Divided", "Leaders of Hormel Strike Arrested; International Holds Trusteeship Hearing", "Effects of Hormel Strike Linger in Minnesota Town", "Today in labor history: Hormel meatpackers launch historic 1985 strike", "They Say Give, We Say Fight Back: The Legacy of the Hormel Strike, Fifteen Years Later", "Minnesota labor and the anti-apartheid struggle", "Local and National Union Clash Over Tactics in Hormel Strike", "The Rev.